Warning: Too Much Sitting is Deadly!

Eileen Blass, USAT (Photo Credit: Usatoday)
Eileen Blass, USAT (Photo Credit: Usatoday)
Eileen Blass, USAT      (Photo Credit:    Usatoday)
Eileen Blass, USAT (Photo Credit: Usatoday)

“In a study of 123,000 people, it was found  the more time people spent sitting, the higher their risk of dying early.” (Eileen Blass, USAT)

Whoa!  That caught my eye!  I don’t want to die early, but I’ve been sitting day in and day out, with only a few minute-breaks, some cooking time and washing clothes just once a week, sometimes two times every a month.

My work  requires that I sit at the computer for as long as 15 to 18 hours a day (add or subtract a few hours for personal pleasure!), and on some really hectic days, my butt is glued on my seat for 24-26 hours!

I reread the news; yes.  Loud and clear.  The health experts have disclosed that prolonged sitting REALLY poses a higher risk on dying EARLY.  Even if you do those regular exercises; no matter  WHERE  you’re sitting.  The AMOUNT OF TIME you spend sitting was the basis for such  a research.

Results on several studies have been suggesting that those who regularly spend MOST of their days sitting are more prone to be FAT, have a HEART ATTACK or even die.

Recently published in an editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, a certain Elin Ekblom-Bak  from the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences suggested “that authorities rethink how they define physical activity to highlight the dangers of sitting.”

Apparently, health officials have already  issued guidelines recommending minimum amounts of physical activity, but so far, there has been no moves to at least highlight the importance of limited time spent on sitting.

Health care authorities have revealed upon analysis that more than 90,000 new cancer cases a year in the United States alone may have been due to physical inactivity and prolonged periods of sitting, which immediately brings to mind  the common CULPRIT why many people sit for TOO LONG and TOO FREQUENTLY – yes… you guessed it right, too.  In front of  the computer.

The analysis was presented  at the annual conference of the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) in Washington, D.C., citing more or less  49,000 cases of breast cancer and 43,000 of colon cancer, somehow giving the idea that such a threat to more lives should push health authorities to pursue more information dissemination activities  to push people to be  more active and more conscious of the amount of time they spend sitting.

Those calculations were based on United States physical activity data and cancer incidence statistics, to which Alpa Patel, an epidemiologist of the American Cancer Society, said that the numbers “seem like very reasonable estimates.”  (Oh my!  We should pay more attention then!)

We already know that physical activity decreases the risk of chronic diseases including cancer, heart disease and diabetes, but to actually learn that a simple action called sitting could be fatal if done for too long periods, should serve as a serious warning to all of us.

What to remember and what to do:

  • “Sitting disease,” refers to  sitting too long WITHOUT moving around.
  • A brisk daily walk of at least 30 minutes could lower a person’s risk over time for breast cancer and colon cancer.
  • Undergoing regular physical activity reduces the risk of breast cancer, colon cancer and endometrial cancer by 25% to 30%.
  • An hour or two at the gym or doing aerobics daily is not enough; meaning, we just have to make sure we don’t sit for the rest of the day, but rather, be conscious of the TIME, have some discipline, get up every now and then to have some breaks from sitting (and from the computer games, Facebook, youtube, whatever!)  LOL

 

FOREWARNED  IS  FOREARMED.  Never say I didn’t warn  YOU!  ^___^

 

Web Sources:

 

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/medical/health/medical/cancer/story/2011-11-03/Prolonged-sitting-linked-to-breast-cancer-colon-cancer/51051928/1

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2010-01-20-sitting-death_N.htm