How To Stop Snoring Without Using Sprays And Pills

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  • Health experts caution against using over-the-counter sprays and pills that are being marketed as stop-snoring aids
  • There are safer fixes that can help you reduce or stop snoring
  • For people who started snoring after gaining weight, losing those extra pounds may help

Do people in your home complain of your snoring?

Snoring is not just a nuisance. People who snore also have an increased risk of developing heart problems. Health experts caution against using over-the-counter sprays and pills that are being marketed as stop-snoring aids, but if you want to have quieter sleep, there are safer fixes that can help you reduce or stop that snoring:

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Eliminate Allergens In Your Room

Allergies can contribute to snoring and the dust mites that accumulate in your pillow could be to blame for the allergic reactions that cause you to snore. Use clean pillows and try to replace them every six months to minimize dust mites and allergens. Pets may also leave animal dander in your bed, which can also trigger allergic reactions. Keep animals out of your bedroom.

Drink More Water

Dehydration causes mucus to form in the nose, which could lead to snoring. Staying hydrated will be a good idea for snorers. It is recommended that men drink about 3.7 liters of water a day, and women, about 2.7 liters of water daily.

Change Your Sleeping Position

Sleeping flat on the back causes the flesh of the throat to relax causing airway blockage. Sleeping on your side will allow air to flow easily and may help reduce or stop your snoring. You can also elevate the head of your bed by four inches to keep your airways open.

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Avoid Alcohol

Alcohol and sedatives can depress the nervous system and cause excessive relaxation of the muscles, which include the tissues in your throat.

Lose Weight

For people who started snoring after gaining weight, losing those extra pounds may help.

“If you gain weight around your neck, it squeezes the internal diameter of the throat, making it more likely to collapse during sleep, triggering snoring,” explained Daniel Slaughter, an otolaryngologist and snoring expert at Capital Otolaryngology in Texas.