Millennials are the loneliest generation, study finds

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  • Millennials are the loneliest generation, a study says
  • This was found by a London-based international research data and analytics group in a study
  • They found that 30 percent of millennials often feel lonely, compared to those from Generation X with only 20 percent and Baby Boomers with 15 percent

A report from a London-based international research data and analytics group found that millennials are the loneliest generation.

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YouGov, in a survey among 1,254 US adults aged 18 and above, found out that 30 percent of the millennials say they often feel lonely, compared to those from Generation X with only 20 percent and Baby Boomers with 15 percent.

This can be attributed to a study conducted by the University of Pennsylvania which found that increased use of social media affects a person’s well-being.

“Here is the bottom line: Using less social media than you normally would leads to significant decreases in both depressi0n and loneliness,” one of the study’s authors, Melissa Hunt, said.

While majority or 70 percent of the millennials in the report said they have at least one best friend and 49 percent have one to four close friends, more millennials also say they have no acquaintances (25 percent), no friends (22 percent), no close friends (27 percent), and no best friends (30 percent).

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Meanwhile, YouGov also found that three out of 10 Americans find it difficult to make friends.

The leading reason, with 53 percent, is being shy. This is followed by not feeling the need to make friends (27 percent), not having hobbies and interests that facilitate friendship (26 percent), believing that friendship is too much work (20 percent), and being somewhere that does not have a lot of people he or she can make friends with (19 percent).

Still, 42 percent of the respondents said they made a new friend within the last six months. The study also found that most Americans or 76 percent found new friends in their workplace; 61 percent in their neighborhood; 44 percent in church or other spiritual community; and 38 percent by starting out a conversation with a stranger.

Source :

YouGov