Mobile App May Soon Identify Individuals Infected With Coronavirus

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  • Researchers are already working on a coronavirus app that uses machine intelligence to enable people to assess whether or not they have contracted coronavirus
  • The app can identify individuals with potential COVID-19 infection based on symptoms and other factors
  • Researchers hope that the app can help direct those at risk to visit healthcare facilities

Is there a mobile app that can identify individuals infected by the coronavirus?

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Unfortunately, no such app exists at this time, but researchers are already working on a coronavirus app that uses machine intelligence to enable people to assess whether or not they have contracted the virus.

Arni S.R. Srinivasa Rao and Jose Vazquez, both from Augusta University, are working with developers to build an app that can identify individuals who may have been infected by COVID-19  based on symptoms and other factors.

The app works by asking individuals about where they live, their gender, age and race, and whether or not they have recent contact with someone who travelled in countries with high cases of infection, or those who contracted coronavirus.

The app will also ask about common symptoms of infection and their duration, which include cough, shortness of breath, fever, fatigue, production of sputum, diarrhea, headache and pneumonia.

Artificial intelligence will then use an algorithm that will provide a risk assessment based on the individual’s information. It will also alert the nearest testing facility that the individual likely requires a health check.

“We are proposing to use machine learning algorithms to be able to improve possible case identifications of COVID-19 more quicker when we use a mobile phone-based web survey. This will also reduce the spread in the susceptible populations,” Rao and Vazquez wrote in their study published on Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology on March 3.

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The researchers hope that the application can help direct those at risk to visit healthcare facilities, as well as provide health officials with information on vulnerable populations, so they can come up with better prevention and treatment strategies.

People will not have to wait for hospitals to screen them directly,” Rao said. “We want to simplify people’s lives and calm their concerns by getting information directly to them.”

The researchers expect that the app will be available within a few weeks. The app will be made available for free since it addresses a public health issue.