Kids who grow up doing chores are more likely to become successful adults

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  • According to experts, kids who are used to doing chores are more likely to become successful adults
  • Chores help an individual develop certain attitudes, just like what most leaders possess
  • Doing the chores also allow kids to feel confident every time they finish a certain task, thus it trains them to be independent

Children who are used to doing household chores are more likely to succeed when they become adults, Julie Lythcott-Haims, former Dean of Freshmen at Stanford University and author of the book How to Raise an Adult, said   .

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According to Lythcott-Haims, doing the chores helps an individual develop strong and positive attitudes, which most leaders possess.

Her statement is based on a research known as the Harvard Grant Study, the longest longitudinal study conducted.

“The Harvard Grant Study [finds] that professional success in life…comes from having done chores as a kid,” she said in a Youtube video from TED Talks.

“And the earlier you start it, the better…If kids aren’t doing the dishes, it means someone else is doing that for them. And so they’re absolved of not only the work, but of learning that work has to be done and that each one of us must contribute for the betterment of the whole,” she added.

Lythcott-Haims said doing chores also allow kids to feel confident every time they finish a certain task, thus teaches them to become independent and responsible individuals.

Psychologist Dr. Shane Owens, in a report from Ladders, also said children learn new skills from doing chores.

“The skills that kids learn early will last most of their lives. Chores teach kids skills that they will need to survive on their own and to get along with others,” she said.

“From an evolutionary perspective, chores teach kids how to take care of themselves and to be a cooperative, productive member of the tribe.”

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Owen added that parents must allow their children to start with a small task around the house in order to open up new learning opportunities.

“Kids cannot learn to do that unless they are provided the opportunity and expected to do chores like cleaning up after themselves and helping with cooking, doing the dishes, and laundry,” said Owen.

She also explained that children who are used to doing chores learn the value of time management which is vital for their success in the future.